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Disability History

This category contains 4 posts

Work for progress, not perfection

Written by Scott Uecker (Edited by NHU Editor) When Hollywood decides to make a biopic of your life, you have definitely made it! After all, only the interesting and provocative are made into a Hollywood movie. The movie I am talking about is Lincoln, which provides an in-depth peek into President Abraham Lincoln’s life. No, … Continue reading

An Open Letter to FDR, Gone, But Never Forgotten

Written by Scott Uecker (Edited by NHU Editor) Dear Mr. President, I was searching through historical newspaper archives and I came across a headline from a New York Times Editorial reading: “Men will thank God on their knees a hundred years from now that Franklin Delano Roosevelt was in the White House”. This headline was … Continue reading

A Curmudgeon’s Lesson in Common Sense

People with disabilities continue to be among the most underutilized resources in our modern workforce.  Despite the hundreds of organizations and federal agencies that have created programs to remedy this issue, the unemployment rate of people with disabilities remains staggeringly high.  It begs the question, why have we not made progress?  Is there some sort … Continue reading

We’ve Come a Long Way Baby: A Reflection on Disability Rights Throughout the Ages

Disability advocates recently celebrated the 22nd Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).  This landmark civil rights law ensures that you, as an American with a disability, have access to the broad range of opportunities that make for a rich and fulfilling life. Something as simple (but essential) as wheelchair ramps for example, is … Continue reading

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